Love affair with a Fiddle Leaf Fig

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I have been coveting Fiddle Leaf Figs since I read about them a year and a half ago on Emily Henderson's blog.  I have just the planter, and just the spot, but I have been doing long stints outside of the country, so it never seems like a good time to bring a new plant into my life.     

The reason fiddle leaf figs have run away with my heart is their scale and irregularity.  They have large stiff asymmetrical leaves and can grow in unexpected ways. They are contemporary sculptures, but alive. 

Emily Henderson's old living room

Emily Henderson's old living room

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Jonathan Adler 

Jonathan Adler 

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Fiddle leaf figs (ficus lyrata ) is native to western Africa.  It grows in lowland tropical rain forests.  As a houseplant, it usually stays shorter and fails to flower or fruit.  

It was awarded the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. To qualify for this ludicrous award, it must meet the following criteria.  

  • must be available
  • must be of outstanding excellence for garden decoration or use
  • must be of good constitution
  • must not require highly specialist growing conditions or care
  • must not be particularly susceptible to any pest or disease
  • must not be subject to an unreasonable degree of reversion.

Emily Henderson

Emily Henderson

Once I learned about fiddle leaf figs, I started seeing them everywhere: in IKEA, in Home Depot, in people's homes, and in television and film sets.

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 10

Mad Men: Season 6, Episode 10

The Good Wife: Season 4, Episode 20

The Good Wife: Season 4, Episode 20

Mistresses: Season 1, Episode 1

Mistresses: Season 1, Episode 1

Arrested Development: Season 4, Episode 15

Arrested Development: Season 4, Episode 15