Roy G. Biv

Hillary's living room in her old apartment

Hillary's living room in her old apartment

Way back when (four years ago) Hillary organized her bookshelves by color, and I thought it was a game changer.  Having a full bookcase is attractive, but color coordinating takes it to the next level.  

Finding Carter: Season 1, Episode 3 - Home office of a narcissistic writer.  

Finding Carter: Season 1, Episode 3 - Home office of a narcissistic writer.  

Digging a little deeper lead me to the article, Arranging Your Books By Color is Not a Moral Failure.  It seems like fancy book-readers were making the author feel a little defensive, but I like a lot of her points.

First of all, it looks good and there is no denying it (looks matter, nerds).  "Not every green-covered or yellow-colored book is the same hue, it had a more subtle effect than I expected...Guests did double takes and smiled when they saw my bookshelves. I did too."

"Those who are opposed to color-organizing bookshelves argue that it’s impractical"  True, but, "using color as an organizing principle actually lends it a random, serendipitous quality that has much in common with the disheveled bookshelf beloved of old-school academics too busy reading books to organize them."

"For another, let’s dispel the notion that everyone with a book collection needs a rigorous system to locate any given book at any given time in order to pull it from their shelf and pounce upon an important fact, passage, quote, or other tidbit that for some reason could not be Googled. Owning physical books was once an imperative for those who wanted knowledge and information at their fingertips, but the reflex to acquire, preserve and catalog books is mostly grounded in a dated reality."   ZING!

"The bookshelf itself has always been a trophy case of sorts. The display of one’s literary conquests is a deliberate exercise in broadcasting who we are."  So let's not pretend that we don't want it to look good.