Art Nouveau

YSL's BOJA lamps......?

For many years IKEA has sold a bamboo rattan egg-shaped table lamp called BOJA.  It always seems a little askew and has the stink of IKEA on it, so I was surprised when it popped up in the sets of Yves Saint Laurent (2014). 

Yves Saint Laurent (2014) - The office off Pierre Bergé, co-founder of Yves Saint Laurent Couture House, life partner of Yves, and junk lamp aficionado.

Yves Saint Laurent (2014) - The office off Pierre Bergé, co-founder of Yves Saint Laurent Couture House, life partner of Yves, and junk lamp aficionado.

They're freakin' everywhere....

The movie isn't great, but outside of these lamps, the sets are pretty sumptuous.  So much so that I wondered if this was actually a classic lamp and IKEA just created a knock-off......but nothing on the internet corroborated that suspicion.

Lamps aside, shout out to this art nouveau restaurant:

Art Nouveau Progressives

The Danish Girl (2015), a film about a transgender pioneer, is stunning from top to bottom, beginning to end, but what interests me is how architecture is used to represent the mindset of characters.  Just as it is commonplace to have villains living in modern architecture, in The Danish Girl, the most progressive Parisian thinkers surround themselves in Art Nouveau.  This art style was most popular between 1890 and 1910, making sense for The Danish Girl timeline, which takes places in the 1920's.  

The first time we see Art Nouveau is when Gerda Wegener (the wife) visits her husband's childhood friend, thinking he could be an ally in a murky trans-world.  Well, you can tell by his entryway that she was right!

She walks through his Art Nouveau door, into his Art Nouveau office, with his Art Nouveau furnishing, to beholds his sexy progressive thinking face. 

And this is the dumbstruck face I would make if I was bombarded with this much architectural beauty, only to find that the owner was cut from marble.  

Next thing Gerda knows, he is taking her to an Art Nouveau cafe.....

...and an Art Nouveau party...

....but she is still having a hard time with the whole trans thing, so she gets emotional and goes back to his place.  Luckily she is able to have a good sit in his Art Nouveau stairwell. 

Finally he recommends a progressive minded doctor who is not dismissive of Gerda's husbands cross dressing.  The couple meets the doctor at a cafe, of sorts.  The scene plays like it is in another location, but it is clearly filmed in Sexy Man's house.  

Art Nouveau doors

Exhibit A - mausoleum doors from Forest Hill Cemetery in Utica, NY

Exhibit A - mausoleum doors from Forest Hill Cemetery in Utica, NY

I just finished watching the film, Suspiria, and despite the sets being infamously eye-catching, what stuck out for my were the art nouveau inspired doors.  

Obviously custom art nouveau doors are stupid-gorgeous (see Exhibit A), but what I liked about the doors in Suspiria was that they felt attainable.  They were simple enough, that they seem like doors I could one day own.  I am sure they won't be cheap, but they seem "manufactured".

Suspiria (1977) - The hallway of a European ballet school, inside a nightmare.

Suspiria (1977) - The hallway of a European ballet school, inside a nightmare.

Therefor, I am going to do a quick Google to see if I can, in fact, purchase this style of doors with a few clicks..........

......................so....................I'm seeing lots of hardware options........................

There is this place, AAW Doors Inc, that has some options, but I don't love them.  They seem to be trying too hard:

US Doors and More seems to have all the same stock, but a few more options.....although I didn't see any that had the elegant simplicity of Suspiria.  

Conclusion:  Failure

I am sure these doors are out there, but they were not a few clicks away.  There weren't even a good number of clicks away.  

If you have a good lead, let me know.

Most Beautiful Room I Didn't See

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When I lived in Paris (that sounded snooty), I made a point to try to  visit every museum I possibly could.  So how did I miss this!!!

Georges Fouquet's jewelry shop was designed in 1901 by Alphonse Mucha and was located at 6 rue Royale.  It was later moved to the Musée Carnavalet

I was going to try to point out some of the design elements, but it turned into a list of every component of the room.  Just look at the peacocks!  And the stained glass!  And the tiled floor!  And the...everything.   

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Mucha is an Art Nouveau kingpin, but he is better known for his work in advertisements.  You might be familiar with some of these posters: 

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Fouquet and Mucha also collaborated on some spectacular jewelry:

Pendant “Cascade“, c. 1900. Gold, enamel, opals, diamonds and Baroque pearls

Pendant “Cascade“, c. 1900. Gold, enamel, opals, diamonds and Baroque pearls

Brooch, ca. 1900

Brooch, ca. 1900

Snake bracelet and ring designed for Sarah Bernhardt ca.1899

Snake bracelet and ring designed for Sarah Bernhardt ca.1899

Necklace 1905

Necklace 1905

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Nouveau Americana

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In the second season of House of Cards, Frank Underwood and The President stroll the halls of the White House, and sit down for a brief chat.  

The chairs they sit in are remarkable.  The furniture in the White House is consistently stately and unsurprising, but these chairs have an unexpected Art Nouveau quality.  They arms of the chair connect to the back in a smooth loop.  The dark wood and caning are classic, and the added organic quality take these chairs to the next level.

If anyone has more information about them, I'm all ears.

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